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Delirium is a frequent occurrence among children hospitalized with cancer, affecting nearly one in five patients, according to new research from Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian.

The study, published Nov. 21 in the Journal of Pediatrics, revealed that children who were either younger than 5 years old, had an underlying brain tumor, were recovering from surgery or receiving benzodiazepines — a class of drugs that treat anxiety, nervousness, seizures and other conditions by altering chemical signals in the brain — were at greatest risk for delirium, a mental state characterized by changes in alertness, cognition or awareness. The investigators say their findings demonstrate that children with cancer are at risk for developing delirium, and underscore the importance of routine screenings for the condition, which is associated with poor health outcomes, prolonged hospital stays and increased distress for patients and their families.

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Dr. Barry Kosofsky spoke on concussion impacts for teens.

The study by Dr. Jennifer Levine and colleagues, which is published in Cancer, found that women who survived childhood cancer faced an increased risk for nonsurgical premature menopause, resulting in lower rates of live birth for female survivors in their 30s.  Learn more 


 

Pediatrics Weill Cornell Medicine Appointments & Referrals: (646) 962-KIDS (646) 962-5437 Chairman's Office: Weill Cornell Medicine 525 E 68th St.
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